Sunday, June 03, 2012

Hoogle Update

Summary: I just updated the Hoogle website. It looks nicer on the iPhone and the source is on GitHub.

The Website

The Hoogle website is (as always) at http://haskell.org/hoogle. I've just uploaded a fresh Hackage index (currently a manual operation, but one I'm intending to automate imminently). I've also made a number of improvements if you are using Hoogle over the iPhone - to simulate the iPhone experience click here.

The Source

The source code has moved to Github: https://github.com/ndmitchell/hoogle. While darcs is a much nicer version control system than Git, GitHub offers a lot of nice features, so I'm using Hoogle as an experiment. I've been promised that projects on GitHub get lots of contributions, so now I wait!

I'm leaving the bug tracker in Google code for the moment, and am considering where the Hoogle manual should live, but a GitHub wiki site is currently looking likely.

6 comments:

Henrique Ferreiro said...

Any reasons why the mobile version isn't avaliable to other smartphones?

Neil Mitchell said...

Henrique: I don't have any other smartphones to test on. If someone tells checks the above link works on their phone, and I can detect it with the browser user agent, I'll happily add it.

Henrique Ferreiro said...

It works for me in an Android phone. That was why I was asking.

Neil Mitchell said...

I've just pushed an update, based on the user agents I found online for Android phones, so hopefully it now works!

Dan Rosén said...

I'm quite a big fan of git, but I have not given darcs a good chance. Do you have some reasons somewhere why you prefer darcs?

Oh, and thanks for making and maintaining hoogle ;)

Neil Mitchell said...

Dan: Git has a lot of state, and works in different modes. If I want to explain git to someone I need an afternoon. In contrast, darcs can be explained with one diagram: http://neilmitchell.blogspot.co.uk/2011/04/darcs-for-my-wife.html. Certainly for my wife the choice is darcs vs nothing, not darcs vs git, because git is too complex.

In practice, if you've taken the time to learn git thoroughly, the community/infra/performance/inertia benefits mean there's not that much point looking at darcs.