Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Generating Open 3D Viewer Models

Summary: It's not obvious how to generate suitable Open 3D Viewer models, but with the right tools it isn't hard.

The Open 3D Viewer project is very cool, as an example here is a demo of a spinning cow rendered in the browser. For my wife's work I wanted to generate a 3D model of a fossil bedding plane. Effectively, given some x/y/z coordinates, produce a pretty rendering. It took a fair bit of guess work, so I wrote down the steps.

Step 1: Generate an OBJ file

Generate an OBJ file. You probably want an MTL file too, but it seems the 3D viewer only uses the Kd field. There are a few ways to get an OBJ file:

  • There are many samples on the web, including a snail in the Open 3D Viewer repo.
  • You can create OBJ files in a tool such as Blender, but the Blender interface confused me a lot (I am definitely not their intended audience).
  • You can generate an OBJ file using a Haskell script. I picked this method, and I'll write a blog about the script later, once I have some pretty pictures to show.

Step 2: Get the tools

There are some tools in the WebGL Loader project. Alas, that project says "for now I recommend r50 as the last stable revision". So now there are two tools to try, the latest and r50. I tried both. I had some limited success with r50 (it didn't seem to render properly, but it did run) while the latest revision segfaulted. Fortunately I found the tools in a Google Groups post, and have mirrored them in my repo (with trivial tweaks to support Python 2.7).

Step 3: Run objcompress

You need to run:

objcompress mymodel.obj mymodel.utf8 > mymodel.js

This will generate lots of mymodel*.utf8 files and mymodel.js.

Step 3: Run

You need to run:


(The file in the email is part&, but I renamed my copy.) This script will interactively ask a really long list of questions. I generate the correct inputs into a file and pipe it in:

py < response.txt

This generates the files groupings.txt and part_info.txt.

Step 4: Run



This generates the file entity_metadata.json.

Step 5: Get the viewer source

You can get the viewer source from the Open 3D Viewer repo. I have mirrored it in my repo, but I may tweak the viewer over time to match my wife's needs - you should get the original.

Step 6: Copy your files

Copy all the files from steps 1 to 4 to a directory inside the viewer named models/mymodel.

Step 7: Update the model list

Open up scripts/models.js and edit it to point at your model. For example:

o3v.MODELS = [{

Step 8: View the result

You can view the result by opening index.html. In Chrome you may need to pass the flag --allow-file-access-from-files.

No comments: