Thursday, September 29, 2016

Full-time Haskell jobs in London, at Barclays

Summary: I'm hiring 9 Haskell programmers. Email neil.d.mitchell AT to apply.

I work for Barclays, in London, working on a brand new Haskell project. We're looking for nine additional Haskell programmers to come and join the team.

What we offer

A permanent job, writing Haskell, using all the tools you know and love – GHC/Cabal/Stack etc. In the first two weeks in my role I've already written parsers with attoparsec, both Haskell and HTML generators and am currently generating a binding to C with lots of Storable/Ptr stuff. Since it's a new project you will have the chance to help shape the project.

The project itself is to write a risk engine – something that lets the bank calculate the value of the trades it has made, and how things like changes in the market change their value. Risk engines are important to banks and include lots of varied tasks – talking to other systems, overall structuring, actual computation, streaming values, map/reduce.

We'll be following modern but lightweight development principles – including nightly builds, no check-ins to master which break the tests (enforced automatically) and good test coverage.

These positions have attractive salary levels.

What we require

We're looking for the best functional programmers out there, with a strong bias towards Haskell. We have a range of seniorities available to suit even the most experienced candidates. We don't have anything at the very junior end; instead we're looking for candidates that are already fluent and productive. That said, a number of very good Haskell programmers think of themselves as beginners even after many years, so if you're not sure, please get in touch.

We do not require any finance knowledge.

The role is in London, Canary Wharf, and physical presence in the office on a regular basis is required – permanent remote working is not an option.

How to apply

To apply, email neil.d.mitchell AT with a copy of your CV. If you have any questions, email me.

The best way to assess technical ability is to look at code people have written. If you have any packages on Hackage or things on GitHub, please point me at the best projects. If your best code is not publicly available, please describe the Haskell projects you've been involved in.

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