Monday, April 11, 2016

GHCid 0.6 Released

Summary: I've released a new version of GHCid, which can interrupt running tests.

I've just released version 0.6.1 of GHCid. To a first approximation, ghcid opens ghci and runs :reload whenever your source code changes, formatting the output to fit a fixed height console. Unlike other Haskell development tools, ghcid is intended to be incredibly simple - it works when nothing else does. This new version features:

Much faster: Since version 0.5 GHCid passes -fno-code to ghci when it makes sense, which is about twice as fast.

Interruptible test commands: Since version 0.4 ghcid has supported a --test flag to pass a test command (e.g. :main) which is run whenever the code is warning free. As of version 0.6 that command will be interrupted if it needs to :reload, allowing long running tests and persistent "tests" - e.g. spawning web servers or GUIs. Thanks to Reid Draper for showing it was possible as part of his ordeal project and Luigy Leon for merging that with GHCid.

Stack integration: If you have a stack.yaml function and a .stack-work directory it will use stack commands to run your project. Thanks to the Stack Team, in particular Michael Sloan, for helping get through all the hoops and providing the necessary functionality in Stack.

More restart/reload flags: It's been possible for a while to pass --restart to restart ghci if certain files change (e.g. the .cabal file). Now there is a separate --reload flag to cause :reload instead of a full restart, and both flags can take directories instead of individual files.

Major relayering: For 0.6 I significantly refactored much of the GHCid code. There has always been an underlying Language.Haskell.Ghcid API, and GHCid was built on top. With the new version the underlying library has been given a significant refactoring, mostly so that interruptions are handled properly without race conditions and with a sane multithreading story. On top of that is a new Session layer, which provides a session abstraction - a ghci instance which tracks more state (e.g. which warnings have been emitted for already loaded files). Then the Ghcid module builds on top, with much less state management. By simplifying and clarifying the responsibility of each layer certain issues such as leaking old ghci processes and obscure race conditions disappeared.

I've been making use of many of these features in the Shake website generator, which I invoke with:

ghcid --test=":main debug" --reload=parts --reload=../docs

This project uses Stack, so relies on the new stack integration. It runs :main debug as the test suite, which generates the website whenever the code reloads. Furthermore, if any of the parts (template files) or docs (Markdown pages) change the website regenerates. I can now edit the website, and saving it automatically regenerates the web pages within a second.


Francesco said...

Very nice, I am `cabal install`ing now.
Also has the spam filter became more harsh? I think I commented on the previous post but it's not showing up apparently!

Neil Mitchell said...

Francesco: I got a notification you posted, and didn't delete it, so no idea where it went - I've reposted it. The spam filters tend to be useless on this blog and I have to manually delete, but maybe offending GitHub comes in for more harsh filtering :P